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More Highlights for Scott Mason

  • Remembering 9/11: WRAL-TV Staffers Reflect

    As the 20th anniversary of the tragic events of 9/11 approaches, WRAL-TV Reporter Amanda Lamb spoke to two WRAL Photojournalist Ed Wilson and WRAL-TV Reporter Scott Mason who vividly remember driving north to cover the aftermath in New York City
  • Tar Heel Traveler Scott Mason Honored for His Impact on North Carolina

    Scott Mason, WRAL’s Tar Heel Traveler, was honored with the Sanford Chamber of Commerce’s Lifetime Achievement Award on Tuesday, February 5, 2019. Meg Moss, executive director for the Sanford Chamber of Commerce, said the award honors Mason for his significant impact
  • WRAL 60th Anniversary “The Early Years” by The Tar Heel Traveler

    WRAL celebrated 60 years of broadcasting on December 15, 2016. In recognition of that anniversary, Scott Mason – better known as The Tar Heel Traveler – took viewers on a time travel, via black and white film footage, to witness several news events covered by WRAL during the early years.

    A few of the highlights include President John F. Kennedy’s visit to the campus of UNC to WRAL News Director Bill Armstrong’s interview with NASA astronaut Neil Armstrong while he was training at the Morehead Planetarium in Chapel Hill. Meet Marlene Carole, WRAL’s first female weatherperson who used a chalkboard to write the high and low temperatures – with an eye-wink. Later we see WRAL transition to color and then lead the nation in HD technology.

    Feature edited by WRAL Tar Heel Traveler photographer Bob Meikle.

  • Dec. 15 Marks 60 years for WRAL-TV

    WRAL-TV’s Tar Heel Traveler Scott Mason features WRAL-TV on his latest installment, in honor of an important anniversary for the Big 5.  Dec. 15, 2016, marks 60 years since WRAL-TV first signed on the air. Check out more from about
  • 1961 and 1962 Protests in Raleigh. Howard Johnson restaurant. NC State name.

    WRAL reporter Scott Mason takes us back to 1961 and 1962 when demonstrators held peaceful protests in Raleigh on two very different subjects.

    In 1961, black people were not permitted to eat at Howard Johnson restaurant on Capitol Boulevard in Raleigh. A peaceful protest was held and the outcome was a change in the law.

    In 1962, another protest demonstration was held in Raleigh when when NC State College expanded its graduate school offerings. The college wanted to change its name to NC State University. The UNC Consolidated System, which governs all state-supported schools in the state, rejected that name and told the school that it had to change its name to UNC-Raleigh. The name became NC State University.