• Elections

    Elections

    Coverage of elections and the political process has always been one of the hallmarks of Capitol Broadcasting Company.  CBC journalists have made political news a priority on the company’s radio and television stations plus the internet.

     

    • Bowles vs Dole Debate

      Democrat Erskine Bowles and Republican Elizabeth Dole debated the pressing issues of 2002 in hope of garnering votes in the upcoming election to represent North Carolina in the United States Senate. The debate was held at Jones Hall on the campus of Meredith College in Raleigh on October 14, 2002. The moderators were WRAL News Anchor David Crabtree and WTVD News Anchor Larry Stogner.

    • Election coverage for 1972 NC primary

      WRAL-TV reporter Russell Capps ready to offer results for Wake County during election coverage.

    • Put Another Election in the Books

      There is no doubt that WRAL covers elections like no other media outlet, but sometimes we even surpass ourselves.  On Tuesday, November 4, 2014, voters went to the polls to cast their ballots in an important mid-term election.  One of
    • WRAL-TV News team at work covering 1984 primary

      Charlie Gaddy, Howard Fox, Celia Hartnett and Phyllis Slocum discuss coverage the night of the 1984 primary election.

    • US Senate Race Jesse Helms vs John Ingram

      WRAL-TV News Reporter Leila Tvedt covered the campaign of Republican Jesse Helms, while reporter Don Kobos covered Democrat John Ingram during the 1978 election.

  • Femme Fare

     

    “Femme Fare—WRAL-TV’s Magazine of the Air for the Modern Woman” was a pioneering weekday program on WRAL-TV from 1963 to 1977.

    The program was hosted by WRAL Woman’s Director Bette Elliott and featured a wide range of news and features with women viewers in mind. Elliott was a veteran newspaper reporter and columnist who quickly found a following as host of the program.

    Femme Fare was produced every weekday in the WRAL-TV studios. The show included regular features on cooking, sewing and flower arranging, but also delved into serious topics such as women’s health, business issues, the arts and culture.

    Elliott used the traditional kitchen set for some segments, but branched out to host full fashion shows and other segments on location outside the studio. She would travel to New York City regularly to get an early look at the fashions of the day, producing reports that would give Triangle viewers insight on the coming trends.

    The Femme Fare program earned several major honors; it claimed the TV-Radio Mirror Award for outstanding programming in 1969 and then again in 1971.

     

    • Bette Elliott

      Femme Fare host enjoying a moment at WRAL-TV 10th anniversary open house in 1966.

    • Bette Elliott greets guests

      Femme Fare host greets guests at WRAL-TV 10th anniversary celebration.

    • Bette Elliott

      Femme Fare host in 1960s staff photo

    • Femme Fare models

      Models posing for Femme Fare television show. Host Bette Elliott always featured the latest fashions on her signature program.

    • Fort Bragg reporters on Femme Fare

      Every week reporters from Fort Bragg would appear on Femme Fare to bring viewers military news. L-R: Private Paul Michels and Sergeant Bill Altman in a December 1966 photo.

  • News Specials

    News Specials

    When major events take place, CBC is there to provide special coverage that goes beyond the typical newscast.  From inaugurations to statewide anniversaries and celebrations, CBC brought the story home to listeners and viewers.

     

    • 1992 NC Friendship Force Trip to Moscow Final report of 11 Elle Lysova

      The USSR ceased to exist on December 26, 1991. A few weeks later, WRAL News anchor Donna Gregory and WRAL photographer Jay Jennings accompanied the NC Friendship Force on a trip to Russia, now formerly the USSR, in mid-January 1992.

      Meet Elle Lyosa, a physical therapist who works at Moscow State University. She is paid the equivalent of three dollars of month. She is a single mother with a four year old son. Their home is an apartment that is 9‘ X 15’. Her outlook is positive as she seeks to better her life.

      This is the last of 11 reports that aired on WRAL News.

    • 1992 NC Friendship Force Trip to Moscow Report #8 Russian Economy

      The USSR ceased to exist on December 26, 1991. A few weeks later, WRAL News anchor Donna Gregory and WRAL photographer Jay Jennings accompanied the NC Friendship Force on a trip to Russia, now formerly the USSR, in mid-January 1992.

      People in Moscow had to stand in long lines to shop for food they often could not afford. Those who had a summer home in the country were able to plant food on the farm that enabled them to store enough food to get them through the bleak winter months.

      This is the eighth of 11 reports that aired on WRAL News.

    • News Coverage of NC Friendship Force Trip to USSR, 1982. Part 8. Soviet Wages

      In November, 1982 WRAL News sent reporter Shelley Kofler and photographer Bruce Wittman to accompany 100 members of the NC Friendship Force, led by the Carolyn Hunt, wife of NC Governor Jim Hunt, to visit Moscow and Leningrad (now Saint Petersburg).

      At that time, the relationship between the governments of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) and America was in a deep freeze. The Berlin Wall remained as a visual reminder that an “Iron Curtain” divided Europe into two separate ideological and geographical areas. Glasnost and perestroika, openness and political reconstruction, were still a few years away for the Soviets.

      The NC Friendship Force did not let these barriers keep them from attempting to thaw relations between the two mighty nations. This grass roots approach proved that common, everyday people can be ambassadors by travelling to countries meeting people on a personal level. They typically stay in the homes of families in the host country so they can experience the everyday life of the culture.

      In this eighth and final report, WRAL reporter Shelly Kofler and photographer Bruce Wittman discover the surprising wages for workers in the Soviet Union.

    • News Coverage of NC Friendship Force Trip to USSR, 1982. Part 7. Home Visits

      In November, 1982 WRAL News sent reporter Shelley Kofler and photographer Bruce Wittman to accompany 100 members of the NC Friendship Force, led by the Carolyn Hunt, wife of NC Governor Jim Hunt, to visit Moscow and Leningrad (now Saint Petersburg).

      At that time, the relationship between the governments of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) and America was in a deep freeze. The Berlin Wall remained as a visual reminder that an “Iron Curtain” divided Europe into two separate ideological and geographical areas. Glasnost and perestroika, openness and political reconstruction, were still a few years away for the Soviets.

      The NC Friendship Force did not let these barriers keep them from attempting to thaw relations between the two mighty nations. This grass roots approach proved that common, everyday people can be ambassadors by travelling to countries meeting people on a personal level. They typically stay in the homes of families in the host country so they can experience the everyday life of the culture.

      In this seventh report, WRAL reporter Shelly Kofler and photographer Bruce Wittman talk with members of the NC Friendship Force about their impressions of Russian hospitality after meeting people in their homes.

    • News Coverage of NC Friendship Force Trip to USSR, 1982. Part 6. Housing Conditions

      In November, 1982 WRAL News sent reporter Shelley Kofler and photographer Bruce Wittman to accompany 100 members of the NC Friendship Force, led by the Carolyn Hunt, wife of NC Governor Jim Hunt, to visit Moscow and Leningrad (now Saint Petersburg).

      At that time, the relationship between the governments of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) and America was in a deep freeze. The Berlin Wall remained as a visual reminder that an “Iron Curtain” divided Europe into two separate ideological and geographical areas. Glasnost and perestroika, openness and political reconstruction, were still a few years away for the Soviets.

      The NC Friendship Force did not let these barriers keep them from attempting to thaw relations between the two mighty nations. This grass roots approach proved that common, everyday people can be ambassadors by travelling to countries meeting people on a personal level. They typically stay in the homes of families in the host country so they can experience the everyday life of the culture.

      In this sixth report, WRAL reporter Shelly Kofler and photographer Bruce Wittman check out the standard of housing for residents in the Soviet Union.

  • Newscasts

     

    News programming is at the very heart of Capitol Broadcasting’s mission statement. CBC Founder A.J. Fletcher promised that his company would provide news and information “without bias or favor,” and CBC news operations have followed that guideline as a core value.

    Over the last six decades WRAL-TV News has distinguished itself as one of the premier television news operations in the country. Central to the success of WRAL-TV News is its award-winning staff of journalists, who report and produce some of the best television newscasts in the nation.

     

    • Vladimir Comes to America

      WRAL News anchor Donna Gregory and news photographer Jay Jennings first met Vladimir Koslov in 1992 in Moscow. Vladimir and his family graciously served as one of several hosts to the NC Friendship Force during their visit to Russia.

      The favor was returned a few months later when Vladimir traveled to America. He split his time staying with Jay and his family, and with Donna and her family. The Jennings took him grocery shopping and to a hockey game. Donna showed Vladimir around the mall in Cary and the local schools and universities.

      Watch and listen to Vladimir share his insights into the differences between life in Russia vs life in America. Hint. There are more smiles in America.

    • 1992 NC Friendship Force Trip to Moscow Final report of 11 Elle Lysova

      The USSR ceased to exist on December 26, 1991. A few weeks later, WRAL News anchor Donna Gregory and WRAL photographer Jay Jennings accompanied the NC Friendship Force on a trip to Russia, now formerly the USSR, in mid-January 1992.

      Meet Elle Lyosa, a physical therapist who works at Moscow State University. She is paid the equivalent of three dollars of month. She is a single mother with a four year old son. Their home is an apartment that is 9‘ X 15’. Her outlook is positive as she seeks to better her life.

      This is the last of 11 reports that aired on WRAL News.

    • 1992 NC Friendship Force Trip to Moscow Report #10 Religion in Russia

      The USSR ceased to exist on December 26, 1991. A few weeks later, WRAL News anchor Donna Gregory and WRAL photographer Jay Jennings accompanied the NC Friendship Force on a trip to Russia, now formerly the USSR, in mid-January 1992.

      WRAL photographer Jay Jennings visited a Russian Orthodox Church in Moscow where parishioners were able to openly worship again. During the years of communist rule, religion was prohibited.

      This is the tenth of 11 reports that aired on WRAL News.

    • 1992 NC Friendship Force Trip to Moscow Report #9 Black Market

      The USSR ceased to exist on December 26, 1991. A few weeks later, WRAL News anchor Donna Gregory and WRAL photographer Jay Jennings accompanied the NC Friendship Force on a trip to Russia, now formerly the USSR, in mid-January 1992.

      The expression, “money talks” rings true when it comes to haggling over price. In the black market of Moscow, American cigarettes and American money “talks” as well. The Russian interpreter, Mary Ann, showed Donna and Jay how to navigate the streets filled with vendors and come out with a bargain.

      This is the ninth of 11 reports that aired on WRAL News.

    • 1992 NC Friendship Force Trip to Moscow Report #8 Russian Economy

      The USSR ceased to exist on December 26, 1991. A few weeks later, WRAL News anchor Donna Gregory and WRAL photographer Jay Jennings accompanied the NC Friendship Force on a trip to Russia, now formerly the USSR, in mid-January 1992.

      People in Moscow had to stand in long lines to shop for food they often could not afford. Those who had a summer home in the country were able to plant food on the farm that enabled them to store enough food to get them through the bleak winter months.

      This is the eighth of 11 reports that aired on WRAL News.

  • Ongoing News Coverage

     

    Good news organizations cover more than breaking news; they cover issues and themes that affect citizens over long periods of time.  Ongoing coverage has always been a strength of CBC newsrooms and that commitment has resulted in local, regional and national awards.

     

    • Miracle on the Hudson US Airways Flight 1549

      On January 15, 2009 US Airways flight 1549 took off from LaGuardia Airport in New York City headed to Charlotte, North Carolina. However, three minutes into the flight, a flock of geese flew into the path of the airliner resulting in massive damage to the engines. Captain Chesley”Sully” Sullenberger and pilot Jeff Skiles were forced to land the aircraft, an Airbus 320, in the Hudson River. The miracle was that all survived the water landing.

      US Airways is based in Charlotte, North Carolina. A “family reunion” of sorts was held in the Charlotte City Chambers for the passengers and crew of the flight. Pat McCrory, then Mayor of Charlotte and future NC Governor, presented passengers and crew commemorative items.

      WRAL News Reporter Ken Smith.

    • WRAL news coverage of Haiti Earthquake 2010

      On January 12, 2010 Haiti was rocked by a 7.0 magnitude earthquake. The devastation was enormous. Many countries responded with humanitarian aide, including the United States. Locally, Pediatrician William C. Carr, MD, and Family Physician Lawrence J. Watts, MD, served on the medical mission organized by Global Medical Outreach of Sampson County.

      WRAL News anchor David Crabtree and photographer Keith Baker spent a week in Haiti covering the work performed by Sampson County physicians. They set up make-shift clinics and provided healthcare under primitive conditions. Crabtree and Baker were pressed into service by holding equipment and providing light from the news camera.

      Watch these two stories to gain insight into what Crabtree and Baker witnessed up close and personal.

      WRAL sent other reporters, photographers and engineers to Haiti to cover the devastation. This is just a glimpse into the coverage.

    • Vladimir Comes to America

      WRAL News anchor Donna Gregory and news photographer Jay Jennings first met Vladimir Koslov in 1992 in Moscow. Vladimir and his family graciously served as one of several hosts to the NC Friendship Force during their visit to Russia.

      The favor was returned a few months later when Vladimir traveled to America. He split his time staying with Jay and his family, and with Donna and her family. The Jennings took him grocery shopping and to a hockey game. Donna showed Vladimir around the mall in Cary and the local schools and universities.

      Watch and listen to Vladimir share his insights into the differences between life in Russia vs life in America. Hint. There are more smiles in America.

    • 1992 NC Friendship Force Trip to Moscow Report #10 Religion in Russia

      The USSR ceased to exist on December 26, 1991. A few weeks later, WRAL News anchor Donna Gregory and WRAL photographer Jay Jennings accompanied the NC Friendship Force on a trip to Russia, now formerly the USSR, in mid-January 1992.

      WRAL photographer Jay Jennings visited a Russian Orthodox Church in Moscow where parishioners were able to openly worship again. During the years of communist rule, religion was prohibited.

      This is the tenth of 11 reports that aired on WRAL News.

    • 1992 NC Friendship Force Trip to Moscow Report #9 Black Market

      The USSR ceased to exist on December 26, 1991. A few weeks later, WRAL News anchor Donna Gregory and WRAL photographer Jay Jennings accompanied the NC Friendship Force on a trip to Russia, now formerly the USSR, in mid-January 1992.

      The expression, “money talks” rings true when it comes to haggling over price. In the black market of Moscow, American cigarettes and American money “talks” as well. The Russian interpreter, Mary Ann, showed Donna and Jay how to navigate the streets filled with vendors and come out with a bargain.

      This is the ninth of 11 reports that aired on WRAL News.

  • Public Affairs and Editorials

    Public Affairs and Editorials

    CBC’s dedication to the public interest is on display through its timely public affairs programming. Regularly-scheduled programs on television and radio examine serious issues that affect the lives of citizens in the community.

    Over the years CBC has also offered television and radio commentary on important issues of the day. By taking a stand, CBC sought to heighten awareness and spark lively debate over issues of public concern.

    • 30 Minutes

      “30 Minutes” was a weekly public affairs program that was produced on WRAL-TV in 1996-97. The program aired on Saturday evenings and was hosted by WRAL news anchor David Crabtree.

      Similar programs in this time period were “Q&A with David Crabtree” and “Headline Saturday.”

    • Carolina Saturday

      “Carolina Saturday” was a WRAL-TV issues program hosted by Public Affairs Director Waltye Rasulala.  The weekly program aired in the 1980s.

    • Editorials

      CBC founder A.J. Fletcher thought that it was important for his company to weigh in publicly on the issues of the day. As a result, CBC has a long history of editorial commentary that aired on WRAL-TV and the company’s radio outlets.

      There’s no doubt that the most famous Capitol Broadcasting Company editorialist was Jesse Helms, whose controversial commentaries were broadcast from 1960-1972. Other commentators who delivered CBC’s editorial opinions over the years include William P. Cheshire, Carl Goerch, Joel Lawhon, J.D. Lewis, Charles Dunn and Giles Lambertson.

      Several guest editorials are featured in this part of the history archive, but notably missing are any of the legendary commentaries by Jesse Helms. WRAL-TV is often asked: What happened to all those “Viewpoint” editorials? The short answer is that the video segments simply weren’t preserved. While that answer is true, it bears more explanation, which in turn calls for a bit of history about television production in the early days of the medium.

      In the early days of broadcasting local television stations carried a mixture of live programming and occasional segments shot on film. Videotape technology was introduced in the 1950s and 1960s, but the new production method did little to promote the archival preservation of television’s early content (to see WRAL-TV’s first videotape machine, type “videotape” into the search box).

      The first VTR (videotape recorder) machines utilized costly reels of two-inch-wide magnetic tape. Standard practice was to record a segment on a reel of videotape and then re-use it after the programming had aired. It was just too expensive for most stations to save tapes for posterity, so they were used over and over until they wore out.

      The new technology made it relatively easy for WRAL personnel to record the Viewpoint editorials, but it also made it just as easy to erase them. Jesse Helms would record his daily editorial on videotape and it would air in that night’s newscast. The next day the same videotape would be rewound and used again—wiping away the previous day’s commentary forever.

      This “re-use” practice erased countless hours of classic programming. Not only were the Viewpoint editorials lost, so were shows like “Tempus Fugit,” “Cap’n Five,” and “Femme Fare.” The practice gradually began to change when smaller, cheaper videotape formats were introduced in the mid-to-late 1970s, but by then many of WRAL-TV’s classic programs had been lost to the ages.

    • Harambee

      “Harambee” was a weekly program hosted by Public Affairs Director J.D. Lewis.  The show focused on issues of the day–particularly those affecting minority communities.

    • On the Record

  • Tar Heel Traveler

     

    The Tar Heel Traveler is the name of a feature reporting segment that has appeared in WRAL-TV newscast since the 1970s.

    Like other local television feature franchises, the Tar Heel Traveler was inspired by Charles Kuralt’s “On the Road” reports that premiered on CBS in 1967. Kuralt traveled the nation’s byways in search of interesting characters, places and things, and it wasn’t long before similar reports showed up on local television stations.

    Channel 5 launched the Tar Heel Traveler in the 1970s and seven reporters have produced stories for the franchise through the years. John Pronk was the first, followed by Skip Cilley, Mike Stevens, Bill Draper, Bill Leslie and Les Boney.

    WRAL’s Scott Mason assumed the Traveler mantle in 2007 and he has produced more than 1,300 Tar Heel Traveler features in the years since.

     

    • WRAL 60th Anniversary “The Early Years” by The Tar Heel Traveler

      WRAL celebrated 60 years of broadcasting on December 15, 2016. In recognition of that anniversary, Scott Mason – better known as The Tar Traveler – took viewers on a time travel, via black and white film footage, to witness several news events covered by WRAL during the early years.

      A few of the highlights include President John F. Kennedy’s visit to the campus of UNC to WRAL News Director Bill Armstrong’s interview with NASA astronaut Neil Armstrong while he was training at the Morehead Planetarium in Chapel Hill. Meet Marlene Carole, WRAL’s first female weatherperson who used a chalkboard to write the high and low temperatures – with an eye-wink. Later we see WRAL transition to color and then lead the nation in HD technology.

      Feature edited by WRAL Tar Heel Traveler photographer Bob Meikle.

    • WRAL 60th Groundbreaking Retrospective by The Tar Heel Traveler

      In recognition of WRAL’s 60th Anniversary, Scott Mason – better known as The Tar Heel Traveler – took viewers back to October 17, 1956 for the groundbreaking ceremonies of the studios on Western Boulevard in Raleigh. WRAL would sign on two months later on December 15, 1956 using a temporary studio in the garage of the transmitter building near Garner.

      Scott Mason interviewed Wesley Williams, former President of Greater Raleigh Merchants Association, for his recollection of that rainy day in October. Also interviewed is CEO Jim Goodmon, grandson of founder A.J. Fletcher and nephew of Fred Fletcher.

      WRAL-FM carried the dedication ceremonies LIVE with Fred Fletcher, VP of Capitol Broadcasting introducing the guest speakers and providing commentary. George Geoghegan, VP of Wachovia Bank and Trust served as Master of Ceremonies. Other speakers included Charles Campbell, President of the Raleigh Chamber of Commerce and Wesley Williams, at the time Secretary of the Raleigh Merchants Association.

      The highlight of the event was Dorothy Collins, star of the NBC television program “Your Hit Parade,” joining CBC Founder and President AJ Fletcher to turn the soil with a gold color shovel. The day was rainy and gray, but everyone beamed with excitement. Dorothy Collins said, “I hope this station goes on forever and ever.”

      Feature edited by WRAL Tar Heel Traveler photographer Bob Meikle.

    • Dec. 15 Marks 60 years for WRAL-TV

      WRAL-TV’s Tar Heel Traveler Scott Mason features WRAL-TV on his latest installment, in honor of an important anniversary for the Big 5.  Dec. 15, 2016, marks 60 years since WRAL-TV first signed on the air. Check out more from about
    • Tar Heel Traveler Skip Cilley intros the new THT John Pronk

      WRAL Tar Heel Traveler Skip Cilley introduces the new Tar Heel Traveler John Pronk. John criss-crossed North Carolina finding interesting folks and their stories from July 1978 – March 1979.

      After Cilley left WRAL, he continued to work in television in Texas, Utah, and Massachusetts before taking a position in St. Louis, Missouri with the Evening Magazine Program. He won several EMMY awards throughout his career.

      After leaving broadcasting, he started Cilley Communications. He made St Louis his home for the remainder of his life. Cilley passed away June 2005.

    • Tar Heel Traveler Skip Cilley and corn shuck chairs

      Skip Cilley was the Tar Heel Traveler from February 1977 – July 1978. In this installment of THT, Skip talks with Thelma Graham in Columbus County, North Carolina. Thelma demonstrates the almost lost art of crafting the bottom of wood chairs with layers of twisted corn shucks.

      Circa 1977. Film.

  • The Southern Sportsman

     

     

    • Franc White THE SOUTHERN SPORTSMAN Commentary 44

      Franc White, better known as The Southern Sportsman, was an avid outdoorsman. Through his television program he shared his love for hunting, fishing, and cooking. Through his “Franc White Commentary” he shared his concerns regarding ecological issues as of 1993. Many say Franc White was way ahead of his time. (Franc White passed away June 6, 2012)

    • Franc White THE SOUTHERN SPORTSMAN Commentary 43

      Franc White, better known as The Southern Sportsman, was an avid outdoorsman. Through his television program he shared his love for hunting, fishing, and cooking. Through his “Franc White Commentary” he shared his concerns regarding ecological issues as of 1993. Many say Franc White was way ahead of his time. (Franc White passed away June 6, 2012)

    • Franc White THE SOUTHERN SPORTSMAN Commentary 42

      Franc White, better known as The Southern Sportsman, was an avid outdoorsman. Through his television program he shared his love for hunting, fishing, and cooking. Through his “Franc White Commentary” he shared his concerns regarding ecological issues as of 1993. Many say Franc White was way ahead of his time. (Franc White passed away June 6, 2012)

    • Franc White THE SOUTHERN SPORTSMAN Commentary 41

      Franc White, better known as The Southern Sportsman, was an avid outdoorsman. Through his television program he shared his love for hunting, fishing, and cooking. Through his “Franc White Commentary” he shared his concerns regarding ecological issues as of 1993. Many say Franc White was way ahead of his time. (Franc White passed away June 6, 2012)

    • Franc White The Southern Sportsman

      WRAL-TV Sports Director, Bob Holliday goes behind the scenes with Franc White, better known as The Southern Sportsman. This is the last of five reports that aired on Action News 5 in 1985.

  • WRAL Documentaries

    WRAL Documentaries

    WRAL-TV is one of the few stations in America that still produces news documentaries on a regular basis.  The station’s fulltime documentary staff turns out long-form programs on a variety of important issues, continuing a longtime commitment to in-depth journalism.

     

    • CRISIS in KOSOVO NC Reaches OUt

      Capitol Broadcasting Company recognizes the vast impact its broadcasting networks can have on our community, and uses them to help provide critical information in times of disaster and need. Sometimes that need is in another country.

      In 1999, WRAL-TV stepped in to help victims across the globe with “Crisis In Kosovo: North Carolina Reaches Out.” The award-winning documentary gave viewers an opportunity to call in donations. The program helped raise over $150,000 for the American Red Cross, Church World Service and Samaritan’s Purse to use in Kosovo. Even though the need was half way around the world from North Carolina, WRAL viewers stepped in to help meet it.

      WRAL News anchors David Crabtree and Pam Saulsby talk with WRAL reporter Mark Roberts, who shared his insights from his recent assignment in Kosovo. Prior to this production, Roberts and news photographer Joe Frieda had been on a ten-day assignment to cover life in several Albanian refugee camps, traveling to the Albanian capital of Tirana filing reports on the conditions under which the refugees were forced to live.

      Senior Producer Phyllis Parish won a silver Telly Award for her writing and producing this WRAL-TV documentary. The station also won recognition for its general reporting on the crisis. WRAL received a Special Report First Place Award for coverage of the “Crisis in Kosovo” from the Radio and Television News Directors Association of the Carolinas Awards for 2000.

    • Kate Smith An American Treasure

      WRAL News anchor Charlie Gaddy produced/wrote this documentary about Kate Smith, “Songbird of the South,” that aired June 1986. Smith may be best known for her rendition of the song “God Bless America.” In 1982, President Ronald Reagan awarded Smith with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, America’s highest civilian honor.

      On June 17, 1986, Smith died at the age of 79 in Raleigh, North Carolina. Charlie Gaddy served as a pallbearer at her funeral.

      Documentary credits: Jay Jennings – Associate Producer/Editor, Bob Gubar – Post Production Director, Kevin Duffus – Studio Director, Art Anderson and Doug Peedin – Studio Design.

    • Charlie Gaddy in China

      Charlie catches a lift on a Chinese street car during visit to produce a WRAL documentary.

    • Susan Dahlin wins EMMY award

      Susan Dahlin, best known as co-host of PM Magazine, was also an excellent producer. Susan produced the 1991 investigative documentary “A Very Giving Person: The Blanche Taylor Moore Story.” She was convicted of killing her boyfriend by slipping arsenic into his food, and is suspected of killing three other people and nearly killing another in the same manner.

      No matter the subject matter, Dahlin was very capable of tackling diverse subjects and brought a high level of professionalism and integrity to her productions. She received the regional EMMY award in 1991. Bob Sadler served as photographer on this documentary.

    • Billy Graham A Simple Country Preacher

      WRAL News anchor David Crabtree introduces this 1997 retrospective feature on Reverend Billy Graham. The documentary was produced, written, reported by WRAL News anchor/reporter Bill Leslie. Bill interviews Billy Graham, his daughter – Anne Graham Lotz, his son – Franklin Graham.