• Elections

    Elections

    Coverage of elections and the political process has always been one of the hallmarks of Capitol Broadcasting Company.  CBC journalists have made political news a priority on the company’s radio and television stations plus the internet.

     

    • Bowles vs Dole Debate

      Democrat Erskine Bowles and Republican Elizabeth Dole debated the pressing issues of 2002 in hope of garnering votes in the upcoming election to represent North Carolina in the United States Senate. The debate was held at Jones Hall on the campus of Meredith College in Raleigh on October 14, 2002. The moderators were WRAL News Anchor David Crabtree and WTVD News Anchor Larry Stogner.

    • Election coverage for 1972 NC primary

      WRAL-TV reporter Russell Capps ready to offer results for Wake County during election coverage.

    • Put Another Election in the Books

      There is no doubt that WRAL covers elections like no other media outlet, but sometimes we even surpass ourselves.  On Tuesday, November 4, 2014, voters went to the polls to cast their ballots in an important mid-term election.  One of
    • WRAL-TV News team at work covering 1984 primary

      Charlie Gaddy, Howard Fox, Celia Hartnett and Phyllis Slocum discuss coverage the night of the 1984 primary election.

    • US Senate Race Jesse Helms vs John Ingram

      WRAL-TV News Reporter Leila Tvedt covered the campaign of Republican Jesse Helms, while reporter Don Kobos covered Democrat John Ingram during the 1978 election.

  • Femme Fare

     

    “Femme Fare—WRAL-TV’s Magazine of the Air for the Modern Woman” was a pioneering weekday program on WRAL-TV from 1963 to 1977.

    The program was hosted by WRAL Woman’s Director Bette Elliott and featured a wide range of news and features with women viewers in mind. Elliott was a veteran newspaper reporter and columnist who quickly found a following as host of the program.

    Femme Fare was produced every weekday in the WRAL-TV studios. The show included regular features on cooking, sewing and flower arranging, but also delved into serious topics such as women’s health, business issues, the arts and culture.

    Elliott used the traditional kitchen set for some segments, but branched out to host full fashion shows and other segments on location outside the studio. She would travel to New York City regularly to get an early look at the fashions of the day, producing reports that would give Triangle viewers insight on the coming trends.

    The Femme Fare program earned several major honors; it claimed the TV-Radio Mirror Award for outstanding programming in 1969 and then again in 1971.

     

    • Bette Elliott

      Femme Fare host enjoying a moment at WRAL-TV 10th anniversary open house in 1966.

    • Bette Elliott greets guests

      Femme Fare host greets guests at WRAL-TV 10th anniversary celebration.

    • Bette Elliott

      Femme Fare host in 1960s staff photo

    • Femme Fare models

      Models posing for Femme Fare television show. Host Bette Elliott always featured the latest fashions on her signature program.

    • Fort Bragg reporters on Femme Fare

      Every week reporters from Fort Bragg would appear on Femme Fare to bring viewers military news. L-R: Private Paul Michels and Sergeant Bill Altman in a December 1966 photo.

  • News Specials

    News Specials

    When major events take place, CBC is there to provide special coverage that goes beyond the typical newscast.  From inaugurations to statewide anniversaries and celebrations, CBC brought the story home to listeners and viewers.

     

    • Memories of Fred Fletcher

      Memories of Fred Fletcher. This video features two programs edited together. The first video is “30 Minutes” hosted by WRAL News anchor Bill Leslie. The second video is “Q&A” hosted by WRAL News anchor David Crabtree.

      Fred, son of AJ Fletcher – founder of Capitol Broadcasting Company, helped launch WRAL-AM in 1939 and soon made a name for himself as the host of a daily talk show called “Tempus Fugit.” Fred would entertain, inform and hold forth with a cast of characters that included his most memorable persona –the lovable “Fairy Tale Man.” During every show Fred would transform into a master storyteller to read the classics from the Brothers Grimm. He was the proverbial one-man-band who created his own sound effects and made up the voices of all the characters. Listeners young and old loved it, and before long “Tempus Fugit” was the top-ranked show in its time period.

    • UNC President William Friday interviewed by WRAL News reporter Laura Leslie

      WRAL News reporter Laura Leslie interviewed UNC System President emeritus William Clyde “Bill” Friday on March 6, 2012. The 15 minute interview was used as a segment within another WRAL news/public affairs program. President Friday addressed several topics including NCAA investigations into the UNC Football program, higher education, tuition costs, politics, and civility.

      Friday was assistant Dean of Students at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill from 1948 to 1951, assistant to the President of the Consolidated University of North Carolina Gordon Gray from 1951 to 1955, then Secretary of the University of North Carolina system, and acting president from 1956 to 1957, when he was chosen to take the position permanently. Friday led the UNC system from 1956 to 1986, a period that included desegregation, challenges to free speech and the creation of a 16-campus state university system in 1971. Enrollment began to surge during his tenure, setting the stage for major expansions and battles over tuition increases in the years since he retired.

      Friday was born in Virginia July 13, 1920 and grew up in Dallas, North Carolina. He died in his sleep on October 12, 2012, coincidentally UNC’s University Day. He was 92.

    • Bowles vs Dole Debate

      Democrat Erskine Bowles and Republican Elizabeth Dole debated the pressing issues of 2002 in hope of garnering votes in the upcoming election to represent North Carolina in the United States Senate. The debate was held at Jones Hall on the campus of Meredith College in Raleigh on October 14, 2002. The moderators were WRAL News Anchor David Crabtree and WTVD News Anchor Larry Stogner.

    • They are Talking Are We Listening

      This WRAL-TV special presentation, “They’re Talking…Are We Listening?” gives viewers insights into what teenagers find to be pressing concerns in their lives, and how they share or not share their thoughts with their parents. The age old phrase “my parents just don’t undertand me” still rings out generation after generation. WRAL-TV news anchor Pam Saulsby and reporter Yvonne SImons lead the discussion. Produced January 2000.

    • Clarence Williams as a teen

      WRAL-TV Director as a teen in 1960s staff photo

  • Newscasts

     

    News programming is at the very heart of Capitol Broadcasting’s mission statement. CBC Founder A.J. Fletcher promised that his company would provide news and information “without bias or favor,” and CBC news operations have followed that guideline as a core value.

    Over the last six decades WRAL-TV News has distinguished itself as one of the premier television news operations in the country. Central to the success of WRAL-TV News is its award-winning staff of journalists, who report and produce some of the best television newscasts in the nation.

     

    • New Anchor for WRAL-TV: Brad Johansen Joins Team in April 2018

      WRAL-TV welcomes Brad Johansen to the WRAL news team, beginning in April of 2018.  Johansen will anchor a variety of newscasts alongside the current WRAL news team of Debra Morgan, Gerald Owens, Kathryn Brown and David Crabtree, who is set
    • THRILL WEEK Stunt Flying

      WRAL Sports photographer Jay Jennings got to be on the other side of the camera during “Thrill Week” November, 1987. In this episode, Jay takes a back-seat ride in a classic P-51 Mustang.

    • THRILL WEEK Demolition Derby

      WRAL Sports photographer Jay Jennings got to be on the other side of the camera during “Thrill Week” November, 1987. Jay drives an Old’s 98 called Country Animal at the demolition derby at the State Fair.

    • THRILL WEEK Climbing the WRAL Tower

      WRAL Sports photographer Jay Jennings got to be on the other side of the camera during “Thrill Week” November, 1987. This episode shows Jay, under the supervision of WRAL engineer Al Dunbar, taking a ride up the broadcast tower via a tiny elevator, so tiny that Jay had to ride on top of the elevator. You will hear Jay talking with SKY 5 pilot Frank Beall as aerial video is a gathered for the story.

    • Jim Graham NC Commissioner of Agriculture swallows tobacco

      Jim Graham (1921 – 2003) was appointed by Governor Terry Sanford to be the NC Commissoner of Agriculture in 1964 and was relected eight times. He served until January 2001. Graham was very popular with North Carolinians. He was easily recognized wearing a Stetson hat, cowboy boots, and a cigar in his hand. In this video we see the peril of chewing tobacco while giving an interview. Graham was a graduate of NCSU.

  • Ongoing News Coverage

     

    Good news organizations cover more than breaking news; they cover issues and themes that affect citizens over long periods of time.  Ongoing coverage has always been a strength of CBC newsrooms and that commitment has resulted in local, regional and national awards.

     

    • THRILL WEEK Shark Fishing

      WRAL Sports photographer Jay Jennings got to be on the other side of the camera during “Thrill Week” November, 1987. In this episode, Jay goes fishing for a shark off the coast of North Carolina.

    • Fred Fletcher Obituary on WRAL News at 5:30

      WRAL news announced the passing of Fred Fletcher to the public on January 8, 2000. He was 89.
      Fred Fletcher was a broadcast executive, entertainer and public servant who — as General Manager of WRAL-AM, WRAL-FM and WRAL-TV — helped shape the first quarter century at Capitol Broadcasting Company.
      Fred started as WRAL-AM’s Education Director and then moved up to General Manager in 1942. Later he took on additional management duties when CBC signed WRAL-FM on the air in 1946.

      The 1950s brought television, and the long, arduous legal battle that eventually won Capitol Broadcasting the coveted license for Channel 5 in Raleigh. Fred was an integral part of the CBC team that fought for and won the license at the FCC.
      When WRAL-TV signed on in December 1956 – Fred Fletcher was at the helm as the first Vice President and General Manager. He was later named President of Capitol Broadcasting Company–a title he held until his retirement in 1975.

    • Hurricane Diana coverage Action News 5 1984

      Hurricane Diana hit the coast of North Carolina with category 4 winds on September 13, 1984. WRAL news, at that time called “Action News 5,” sent news crews to various NC coastal locations to cover evacuations and damage. This video is a compilation of news stories that aired over several days. You will see WRAL news reporters Fred Taylor, Bill Draper, Tim Kent, Shelly Kofler, Bryan Glazer,and Nina Szlosberg.

    • 2006 Year Ender

      WRAL News Anchor Gerald Owens recaps the top local news stories of the year 2006.

    • WRAL News Anchor David Crabtree interviews retired news anchor Charlie Gaddy 2002

      WRAL News anchor David Crabtree interviews retired WRAL News anchor Charlie Gaddy. Their conversation ranges from covering the news during Gaddy’s early years at WRAL to the current state of local news gathering as of 2002 when this interview was conducted. Charlie Gaddy worked at WRAL from August 1970 until his retirement in June 1994. During Gaddy’s time, WRAL News was ranked #1 in the nation in 1984. Crabtree joined WRAL in March, 1994.

  • Public Affairs and Editorials

    Public Affairs and Editorials

    CBC’s dedication to the public interest is on display through its timely public affairs programming. Regularly-scheduled programs on television and radio examine serious issues that affect the lives of citizens in the community.

    Over the years CBC has also offered television and radio commentary on important issues of the day. By taking a stand, CBC sought to heighten awareness and spark lively debate over issues of public concern.

    • 30 Minutes

      “30 Minutes” was a weekly public affairs program that was produced on WRAL-TV in 1996-97. The program aired on Saturday evenings and was hosted by WRAL news anchor David Crabtree.

      Similar programs in this time period were “Q&A with David Crabtree” and “Headline Saturday.”

    • Carolina Saturday

      “Carolina Saturday” was a WRAL-TV issues program hosted by Public Affairs Director Waltye Rasulala.  The weekly program aired in the 1980s.

    • Editorials

      CBC founder A.J. Fletcher thought that it was important for his company to weigh in publicly on the issues of the day. As a result, CBC has a long history of editorial commentary that aired on WRAL-TV and the company’s radio outlets.

      There’s no doubt that the most famous Capitol Broadcasting Company editorialist was Jesse Helms, whose controversial commentaries were broadcast from 1960-1972. Other commentators who delivered CBC’s editorial opinions over the years include William P. Cheshire, Carl Goerch, Joel Lawhon, J.D. Lewis, Charles Dunn and Giles Lambertson.

      Several guest editorials are featured in this part of the history archive, but notably missing are any of the legendary commentaries by Jesse Helms. WRAL-TV is often asked: What happened to all those “Viewpoint” editorials? The short answer is that the video segments simply weren’t preserved. While that answer is true, it bears more explanation, which in turn calls for a bit of history about television production in the early days of the medium.

      In the early days of broadcasting local television stations carried a mixture of live programming and occasional segments shot on film. Videotape technology was introduced in the 1950s and 1960s, but the new production method did little to promote the archival preservation of television’s early content (to see WRAL-TV’s first videotape machine, type “videotape” into the search box).

      The first VTR (videotape recorder) machines utilized costly reels of two-inch-wide magnetic tape. Standard practice was to record a segment on a reel of videotape and then re-use it after the programming had aired. It was just too expensive for most stations to save tapes for posterity, so they were used over and over until they wore out.

      The new technology made it relatively easy for WRAL personnel to record the Viewpoint editorials, but it also made it just as easy to erase them. Jesse Helms would record his daily editorial on videotape and it would air in that night’s newscast. The next day the same videotape would be rewound and used again—wiping away the previous day’s commentary forever.

      This “re-use” practice erased countless hours of classic programming. Not only were the Viewpoint editorials lost, so were shows like “Tempus Fugit,” “Cap’n Five,” and “Femme Fare.” The practice gradually began to change when smaller, cheaper videotape formats were introduced in the mid-to-late 1970s, but by then many of WRAL-TV’s classic programs had been lost to the ages.

    • Harambee

      “Harambee” was a weekly program hosted by Public Affairs Director J.D. Lewis.  The show focused on issues of the day–particularly those affecting minority communities.

    • On the Record

  • Tar Heel Traveler

     

    The Tar Heel Traveler is the name of a feature reporting segment that has appeared in WRAL-TV newscast since the 1970s.

    Like other local television feature franchises, the Tar Heel Traveler was inspired by Charles Kuralt’s “On the Road” reports that premiered on CBS in 1967. Kuralt traveled the nation’s byways in search of interesting characters, places and things, and it wasn’t long before similar reports showed up on local television stations.

    Channel 5 launched the Tar Heel Traveler in the 1970s and seven reporters have produced stories for the franchise through the years. John Pronk was the first, followed by Skip Cilley, Mike Stevens, Bill Draper, Bill Leslie and Les Boney.

    WRAL’s Scott Mason assumed the Traveler mantle in 2007 and he has produced more than 1,300 Tar Heel Traveler features in the years since.

     

  • The Southern Sportsman

     

     

    • Franc White The Southern Sportsman

      WRAL-TV Sports Director, Bob Holliday goes behind the scenes with Franc White, better known as The Southern Sportsman. This is the last of five reports that aired on Action News 5 in 1985.

    • Franc White The Southern Sportsman

      WRAL-TV Sports Director, Bob Holliday goes behind the scenes with Franc White, better known as The Southern Sportsman. This is the fourth of five reports that aired on Action News 5 in 1985. Note his easy to identify airplane with the Zebra stripes.

    • Franc White The Southern Sportsman

      WRAL-TV Sports Director, Bob Holliday goes behind the scenes with Franc White, better known as The Southern Sportsman. This is the third of five reports that aired on Action News 5 in 1985.

    • Franc White The Southern Sportsman

      WRAL-TV Sports Director, Bob Holliday goes behind the scenes with Franc White, better known as The Southern Sportsman. This is the second of five reports that aired on Action News 5 in 1985.

    • Franc White The Southern Sportsman

      WRAL-TV Sports Director, Bob Holliday goes behind the scenes with Franc White, better known as The Southern Sportsman. This is the first of five reports that aired on Action News 5 in 1985.

  • WRAL Documentaries

    WRAL Documentaries

    WRAL-TV is one of the few stations in America that still produces news documentaries on a regular basis.  The station’s fulltime documentary staff turns out long-form programs on a variety of important issues, continuing a longtime commitment to in-depth journalism.

     

    • No Joy in Mudville documentary

      “No Joy in Mudville” provides an in-depth look into sports on various levels of participation from little league games to college to professional. Sports has become an obession with winning as the only acceptable outcome. The documentary also looks at co-ed sports, injuries, pressure on athletes and coaches, and life after sports.
      WRAL-TV participated in the Eighth Decade Consortium comprised of five television stations across the country. The other four stations were WJLA in Washington, D.C., WCVB in Boston, KSTP in Minneapolis, and KOMO in Seattle. Each station produced a segment in the documentary. WRAL produced the first segment, “For Saturday Afternoon Glory” written by WRAL Sports Director Bob Holliday and produced by Chuck Maye.
      The program was hosted by WRAL News anchor John Hudson. The opening voice-over was by Bill Leslie. “No Joy in Mudville” aired September 12, 1983. The subject matter is still relevant to this day.

    • Memories of Fred Fletcher

      Memories of Fred Fletcher. This video features two programs edited together. The first video is “30 Minutes” hosted by WRAL News anchor Bill Leslie. The second video is “Q&A” hosted by WRAL News anchor David Crabtree.

      Fred, son of AJ Fletcher – founder of Capitol Broadcasting Company, helped launch WRAL-AM in 1939 and soon made a name for himself as the host of a daily talk show called “Tempus Fugit.” Fred would entertain, inform and hold forth with a cast of characters that included his most memorable persona –the lovable “Fairy Tale Man.” During every show Fred would transform into a master storyteller to read the classics from the Brothers Grimm. He was the proverbial one-man-band who created his own sound effects and made up the voices of all the characters. Listeners young and old loved it, and before long “Tempus Fugit” was the top-ranked show in its time period.

    • In Praise of Nature Ansel Adams photography documentary

      The work of Ansel Adams represents the pinnacle of photography to many, forever reverent in its praise for the wonders of nature. More than 60 of Adams’ legendary photographs were placed on exhibit at the NC Museaum of Art from October 2000 to January 2001. The exhibit was called, “In Praise of Nature: Ansel Adams and Photographers of the American West.” WRAL News anchor David Crabtree and production photographer Bob Sadler, along with curator John Coffey, give us insights into the life of Adams and a look at his brilliant photography.

    • A Conversation with President Jimmy Carter

      President Jimmy Carter, 39th President of the United States of America, talks about the book he wrote about his mother, Lillian Carter with WRAL News anchor David Crabtree. David’s conversation with President Carter brings about many interesting stories that made Miss Lillian “A Remarkable Mother.” Aired May 2008.

    • Organ Donation The Gift of Life

      “Organ Donation, The Gift of Life” documentary first broadcast during “Organ Donation Awareness Month” on April 24th, 2001. The program received high ratings and encouraged viewers to become, or at least consider becoming, organ donors. The documentary aired about a month later on June 2, 2001.
      Through the program, WRAL introduced its viewers to three North Carolina families who have struggled with sickness and death. Despite their tragedies, these families have received the ultimate gift of giving, the gift of life, through organ donation.
      The documentary tells the story of Michelle Peele, a Southern Pines mother who lost her daughter in a tragic car accident. Only two weeks before the accident, daughter Morgan told her mother she wanted to be a donor. Because of that decision, Morgan’s organs save the lives of eight people.
      Viewers are also reminded of the story of the local teacher who gave a kidney to save the life of one of her students. Other instances are chronicled as well. The documentary sought to dispel myths about organ donation.
      WRAL-TV Anchor Bill Leslie hosts the program. WRAL-TV’s Phyllis Parish served as producer with support from Bob Sadler, Shelly Leslie, Bill Burch and Steve Elizondo.