• Androgena

    Androgena

    The Androgena Show was an educational program for children produced by WRAL-TV. The program aired from August 1992 to May 1996.

    Show producer David Creech based the series on the adventures of a puppet named Androgena and her friend Sammy Lou.

    The program was designed for young children, ages 5 to 9. It was entertaining, but also included social and educational themes such as self-esteem, sibling rivalry, recycling, ethnic differences, starting school and more.

     

    • The Androgena Show

      The Androgena Show was an educational program for children produced by WRAL-TV. The program aired from August 1992 to May 1996. This episode was produced in 1994.
      Show producer David Creech based the series on the adventures of a puppet named Androgena and her friend Sammy Lou.
      The program was designed for young children, ages 5 to 9. It was entertaining, but also included social and educational themes such as self-esteem, sibling rivalry, recycling, ethnic differences, starting school and more.

    • Androgena

      This episode of Androgena highlights good healthy habits. The Androgena Show was a half-hour children’s program revolving around the adventures of the puppet Androgena and her friend Sammy Lou. This locally produced program entertains children, ages 5 to 9. Although entertaining, the show includes social and educational themes, such as self-esteem, sibling rivalry, recycling, ethnic differences, starting school and more. Produced locally by WRAL-TV, The Androgena Show aired August 1992 to May 1996. (Produced by Susan Dahlin)

    • Androgena

      The Androgena Show was a half-hour children’s program revolving around the adventures of the puppet Androgena and her friend Sammy Lou. This locally produced program entertains children, ages 5 to 9. Although entertaining, the show includes social and educational themes, such as self-esteem, sibling rivalry, recycling, ethnic differences, starting school and more. Produced locally by WRAL-TV, The Androgena Show aired August 1992 to May 1996.

    • Androgena

      Publicity photo for the Androgena show

    • Androgena 1994

      The Androgena Show is a half-hour children’s program revolving around the adventures of the puppet Androgena and her friend Sammy Lou. This locally produced program entertains children, ages 5 to 9. Although entertaining, the show includes social and educational themes, such as self-esteem, sibling rivalry, recycling, ethnic differences, starting school and more. Produced locally by WRAL-TV, The Androgena Show aired August 1992 to May 1996. This episode, produced September 30, 1994 features Grandfather Mountain.

  • Bozo

     

    Bozo was a popular clown character who was licensed to television stations across the U.S.

    The Bozo character first appeared in the 1940s as a mascot for record company Capitol Records, but it was not until 1956 that Bozo began showing up on TV stations across the country. That’s when the creative rights to Bozo were purchased by Larry Harmon, an entrepreneur who began franchising the character to local TV stations – including WRAL – that began producing their own Bozo the Clown shows.

    At WRAL, Bozo was portrayed by the legendary Paul Montgomery, who went on to fame as “Uncle Paul.” Montgomery was legally blind, but each day he donned a red nose, pancake makeup and baggy costume as he portrayed America’s most famous clown.

    WRAL-TV ended the Bozo show in 1961 when the franchise contract became too expensive. In its place came a program titled “Time for Uncle Paul,” which propelled Montgomery to stardom.

    Perhaps the most famous performer to portray Bozo was Willard Scott, who later became the lovable weatherman on NBC’s Today Show. The syndicator of the Bozo franchise claims that more than 200 actors have appeared as the clown since television franchising began in 1956.

     

  • Brain Game

     

    Brain Game is WRAL-TV’s academic trivia program featuring ninth and tenth grade students competing in a weekly competition. The show challenges students’ knowledge in the areas of math, science, history, public affairs/current events, and the arts.

    WRAL began producing Brain Game in 1997 and the program’s first host was WRAL-TV Chief Meteorologist Greg Fishel. Former WRAL Traffic reporter Mark Roberts took over hosting duties in 2002.

    Brain Game is produced in the grand tradition of the old College Quiz Bowl shows, but includes modern production techniques such as video and audio clues for the contestants. Each week, three teams from North Carolina high schools compete against one another, with the top-scoring team capturing a spot in the year-end playoffs.

    The action is fast and fun, as players “buzz in” to answer questions drawn from the state’s 9th & 10th grade curricula. Contestants also answer questions about current events and popular culture. The atmosphere combines the excitement of a game show with the thrills of a high school pep rally.

    Brain Game is produced as an instructional/educational program for children aged 16 and under. It airs on Saturday mornings each week.

     

    • BRAIN GAME Nov 15 2003

      Three North Carolina High Schools compete for academic accolades on “Brain Game.”

      This episode of Brain Game aired November 15, 2003. The competition was between St. David’s High School in Wake County, Jordan High School in Durham County, and Bunn High School in Franklin County. The host is Mark Roberts.

      Watch and find out who won this episode of “Brain Game.”

    • Raleigh Charter High School Crowned WRAL’s Brain Game Champs

      Are you smarter than a high school student?  Probably not, if we’re talking about Raleigh Charter High School.  WRAL-TV recently crowned the Raleigh Charter Team as the 2016 Brain Game Champions. On Tuesday, May 17, 2016, Brain Game Host Mark
    • WRAL-TV’s Brain Game Reveals New Set

      Last weekend CBC’s long-running local high school quiz show Brain Game debuted a new look.  Capcom checked in with WRAL-TV Producer Kevin Shand to get the scoop on the new set: The new Brain Game Set premiered on-air January 9,
    • PROMO Brain Game with host Greg Fishel

      Brain Game premiered in January 1997 as one of the components of WRAL’s For The Children programming campaign. Brain Game is produced as an instructional/educational program targeting viewers 16 years of age and younger. Three teams with three members each, representing area high schools, compete for points by answering questions.
      The first host of Brain Game was WRAL meteorologist Greg Fishel.

    • Brain Game

      “Brain Game” is hosted by Mark Roberts. Students from three area high schools compete to answer questions in categories from math and science, to arts and current events. The winning team advances to the playoffs for a chance at the Brain Game Championship.

  • Captain 5

    Captain 5

    The Cap’n Five Show was a locally-produced children’s program that ran on WRAL-TV from 1958-1961. The show starred WRAL staff announcer Herb Marks as the commander of a submarine that docked in the TV fantasyland known as “Happy Harbor.”

    The show was produced before a studio audience full of energetic children who would arrive at WRAL each day ready for their voyage into the world of television make-believe. Marks would don his skipper’s cap and perform with a Charlie McCarthy-like puppet—telling stories and jokes to keep the children entertained and under control.

    In its early years Cap’n Five featured a huge submarine prop that was used as the centerpiece of the show’s studio production. Eventually that prop disappeared and Marks—who was an amateur ventriloquist and seasoned performer–became the central feature of the program.

    Marks would entertain the kids and then introduce cartoon favorites like Popeye, Huckleberry Hound and Quick Draw McGraw. He also used an assortment of games and gimmicks, including a “Whatzit Box” that contained a secret object. If a child could guess what was inside he or she would go home with the prize.

    WRAL legend Paul Montgomery made numerous guest appearances on Cap’n Five as a German-accented character known as “Heinrich von Stuplebaum.” Montgomery went on to star in his own children’s program, “Time for Uncle Paul.”

    The Cap’n Five Show came to an end in 1961, but not before blazing a trail as one of the first locally-produced children’s shows on Channel 5.

     

    • WRAL performer Herb Marks

      Marks dressed as cowboy character. Marks was best known for portraying Capn 5, a cartoon show in the late 50s.

    • Capn 5 contest winner

      Donald Wayne Adams of Raleigh receives set of Encyclopaedia Britannica as winner of the Spotluck contest. Herb Marks, who portrayed Capn 5, presents the books.

    • Capn Five Hi-Yo Silver yelling contest winner

      Harry Raynor of Raleigh proved to be the loudest contestant in the contest designed to promote the Lone Ranger features on Capn Five.

    • Herb Marks

      Capn 5 star Herb Marks in one of the last photos taken before his death in 2015

    • Capn 5 show in studio

      Herb Marks and Paul Montgomery entertain the kids during a Capn 5 show

  • Central Xpress

     

    CentralXpress.com was a WRAL-TV educational program designed for young teens.  The cast was made up of local actors.  The show won a national Gabriel Award for an episode dealing with school safety.

     

    • centralXpress

      “CentralXpress” is an award winning program designed for young teenagers. This episode deals with the emotions of students after hearing about the death of a friend. (Commercial breaks included)

    • Central Xpress.Com

      Central Xpress.com is a WRAL-TV original program for children and teens. The program received national recognition with this episode, “Bomb Threat.” It won a Gabriel Award in the Children’s Programming category.

    • Central Xpress

      Central XPress is a program designed to engage youth 10 -16 years of age.

  • Frog Hollow

    Frog Hollow

    Television programming for children underwent a significant shift in the late 1970’s – early ‘80s. The days of a circus atmosphere including clown characters with wild hair and bright costumes, pie in the face humor and children marching around the studio quickly faded into history. Parents desired—and the FCC began requiring–programs that would prompt curiosity, show various cultures, explore history and provide an educational component.

    “Frog Hollow” was a WRAL children’s program that premiered in July, 1981 and aired each weekend through early 1985. The program was designed for preschoolers and emphasized good moral values and effective problem solving techniques as taught through music, dance and humorous situations.

    The setting was a country general store in the hamlet of “Frog Hollow.” Peter Anlyan auditioned and won the role as “Pete the storekeeper.” Anlyan arrived with a background in theatre from New York University and wrote many of the scripts for the show.

    Becky Lofland was the voice behind the puppet named “Facetia.” Becky used her background in psychology to write scripts in a manner and tone to engage young viewers.

    Vivian Wells played the school teacher. Betsy Blair portrayed a variety of characters and often used dance and mime in her skits. Michael Evans played several characters including the “Lone Trucker,” who would stop by the general store to chat and sing with Pete and help solve various dilemmas with the other characters.

    Special guest appearances were made by local doctors, dentists, dieticians, musicians, and actors portraying various historic figures. Julie Wick served as the first producer of Frog Hollow, followed by Lisa Cline.

    “Frog Hollow” won the 1984 National Iris Award presented by the National Association of Television Program Executives. The winning entry was produced by Lisa Cline and written by Peter Anlyan. The Iris Award is considered one of the most prestigious awards in television programming. The award signified “Frog Hollow” as that year’s best children’s program in the nation’s mid-sized television markets.

     

    • The Great Fiddle Chase episode of Frog Hollow

      “The Great Fiddle Chase” episode of Frog Hollow was videotaped on location in several areas of North Carolina and Virginia, including segments shot onboard a train in Covington, Viriginia. Watch how the story develops into a wonderful lesson about forgiveness.
      Frog Hollow was an award winning, innovative children’s program for pre-school aged children. The show received the prestigous Iris Award for Best Children’s Program in medium market stations. It also won an Action for Children’s Television award in 1982. This episode was produced by Julie Wick and aired May 12, 1982.

    • Frog Hollow

      The episode of Frog Hollow was produced in 1984. “Frog Hollow” was an award winning children’s program for pre-school aged children. The show received the prestigous Iris Award for Best Children’s Program in medium market stations. It also won an Action for Children’s Television award in 1982.

    • Frog Hollow

      This episode of Frog Hollow was produced September 15, 1983 and produced by Julie Wick. “Frog Hollow” was an award winning children’s program for pre-school aged children. The show received the prestigous Iris Award for Best Children’s Program in medium market stations. It also won an Action for Children’s Television award in 1982.

    • Peter Anlyan Program producer

      Peter Anlyan is a versatile and creative person who worked in a variety of different roles at Capitol Broadcasting. He started at WRAL-TV in 1981 when he created the children’s show “Frog Hollow” and played the role of “Pete the storekeeper.” The program received several national awards.

      Peter went on to produce special televised projects for WRAL and eventually became the point person in Durham in the development of the Durham Bulls Baseball team and the ballpark.

      Peter is interviewed by John Harris, Director of CBC Special Projects, about his early days at WRAL-TV, Capitol Broadcasting, Jim Goodmon, and the Durham Bulls.

    • Frog Hollow February 1985

      “Frog Hollow” was an award winning children’s program for pre-school aged children. The show received the prestigous Iris Award for Best Children’s Program in medium market stations. It also won an Action for Children’s Television award in 1982.

  • Romper Room

     

    Romper Room was a syndicated children’s program that began in Baltimore in 1953 and ran on WRAL-TV in the late 1950s.

    The program aired each weekday and featured a teacher leading a small class of preschoolers through games, exercises, songs and other lessons that sought to teach good manners and citizenship.

    WRAL-TV’s first Romper Room “teacher” was Jo Ann Federspiel, a former classroom educator who came to Raleigh from South Carolina. “Miss Jo Ann” joined the WRAL staff in the spring of 1958.

    The legendary Paul Montgomery provided musical accompaniment for the early Romper Room classes on Channel 5. Montgomery went on to fame as the host of the “Time for Uncle Paul” show. He was also a noted jazz musician.

     

    • Miss Margaret of Romper Room

      Margaret Brickell cuts cake at 2nd anniversary celebration for Romper Room.

    • WRAL Christmas parade float

      Paul Montgomery and Margaret Brickell ride the TV5 float in the 1959 Raleigh Christmas parade.

    • Romper Room fun at Pullen Park

      Miss Margaret rides merry-go-round with children at WRAL-TV end of summer celebration.

    • Miss Margaret of Romper Room

      Margaret Brickell became the second teacher of the WRAL Romper Room in September 1959. Brickell was an instructor at NC State. She replaced JoAnn Federspeil as the show hostess.

    • Romper Room 1st anniversary

      Miss JoAnn Federspeil blows out the candle to celebrate Romper Room first birthday. The party took place May 25, 1959 and was attended by some 150 lively youngsters.

  • Smart Start

     

    SMART START KIDS

    “Smart Start Kids” is an award-winning WRAL-TV children’s program designed for 3-to-5 year olds and their families. The program was produced in cooperation with the NC Partnership for Children/Smart Start, North Carolina’s nationally-recognized initiative to ensure that every child reaches his or her potential and is prepared to succeed in a global community.

    In each of the program’s 74 episodes, local children share their “news,” explore their world and talk about their experiences. Each week “Willa,” host of Smart Start Kids, and the children engage in fun activities that promote healthy child development and serve as positive examples for viewers.

    Produced in a magazine-style format, the children interact with “Willa” and travel to fun, educational places across the state. Together they experience trips to new geographical locations, learn from hands-on activities, and create their own memorable stories and music.

    Young viewers were also able to participate from home or a childcare center by calling the Smart Start toll-free phone number to share their own exciting, personal stories such as a first trip to the beach or the arrival of a new puppy. This toll-free phone number provided access for all North Carolina children.

    WRAL produced the program from 2002-2011. It won the prestigious Mid-South Regional Emmy Award in the Children’s Educational Program category in 2004 and 2009.

    The Smart Start Kids program is still broadcast in syndication each week on WRAL-TV and WILM-TV in Wilmington. It’s also made available to UNC-TV for statewide distribution.

     

    • Smart Start Kids SD episode 51

      Smart Start Kids is a locally produced children’s program for 3- to 5-year olds and their families. Local children are the “stars” of the show and go “behind the scenes” of interesting places throughout North Carolina. Besides fun, educational “field trips,” host Willa Brigham, encourages children to share their stories, sing songs, ask questions and play along. Smart Start Kids began airing on WRAL in October 2002 and won a Mid-South Regional Emmy Award in the Children’s Educational Program category in 2004. Besides WRAL, Capitol Broadcasting Company also broadcasts this program on its stations in Charlotte and Wilmington and shares this award-winning program with statewide television station UNC-TV.

    • Smart Start Kids

      Smart Start Kids is a locally produced children’s program for 3-to 5-year olds and their families. Local children are the “stars” of the show and go “behind the scenes” of interesting places throughout North Carolina. Besides fun, educational “field trips,” host Willa Brigham, encourages children to share their stories, sing songs, ask questions and play along. Smart Start Kids began airing on WRAL in October 2002 and won a Mid-South Regional Emmy Award in the Children’s Educational Program category in 2004. Besides WRAL, Capitol Broadcasting Company also broadcasts this program on its stations in Charlotte and Wilmington and shares this award-winning program with statewide television station UNC-TV.

    • Smart Start KIDS logo

      Logo for CBC’s award winning children’s program Smart Start Kids. 74 episodes of the program were produced for syndication. The program still airs on WRAL-TV and WILM-TV.

  • Sparks

     

    Sparks was a WRAL children’s program that premiered in 1985 and aired Saturday mornings through 1990. The half-hour fantasy/drama program primarily engaged older elementary school children and pre-teens.

    The stories revolved around a mysterious time machine that could transport the characters into the past or future to resolve conflicts and/or provide insight and better understanding of specific time periods.

    Sparks was set in a mythical North Carolina town in the time of the show’s production- the mid to late 1980s. The ongoing story line is rooted in a fictitious incident that occurred on June 17, 1955.

    The lead character Sam Blade was a government scientist working on a top secret project, code name “Sparks.” Blade invented a time machine and then transported himself into the future.

    During his trip he discovered that the government had ulterior motives for the machine. Upon his return, Blade realized the need to hide the machine as well as himself. Meanwhile the government is trying to find him. Actor Mark J. Miller portrayed Sam Blade.

    Junius Fogg, Blade’s best friend, is a small-appliance repairman. Even though Blade and Fogg are the same age, Blade’s time travel of thirty years into the future put him into time limbo – he did not age. Consequently the gray-haired Fogg is now thirty years older than Blade. This became a comical source of conflicts within the various plots of the show. The time machine is now safely and secretly stashed away in a back-room at Fogg’s Fix-It Shop. Actor Mark Cath portrayed Junius Fogg.

    The youth aspect of Sparks was introduced through Fogg’s grandchildren, Tory and Zachary, and their friends. The script writers tackled dilemmas and issues that confronted them. Many of these concerns were worked out in the malt shop setting called “Shades” – a local hangout for youth. Topics ranged from cheating, bullying, lying, stealing, name-calling, peer-pressure, etc. Young actress Meredith Nicolson played Tory and Joshua Bo Lozoff played the role of Zachary. Kent Faulcon portrayed Nathan, Zach’s best friend. Later in the series Steve Joe joined the cast playing Nick and Meg Plunkett played his girlfriend, Jennifer.

    The time travel sequences transported the various characters back in time to meet literary characters like Ichabod Crane from Washington Irving’s short story, “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” and historical figures including Harry Houdini and Blackbeard the Pirate, to name a few. Examination of historical periods ranged from the “Trail of Tears” of the Cherokee Indians, gold mining in the 1800’s, slavery, and the pony express mail delivery.

    Sparks was created and produced by Peter Anlyan. Cindy Carter wrote many of the scripts. In the latter years Sparks was produced by Dan Oliver, who also served as the director/photographer on segments produced away from the studio.

    Sparks received a national Iris award in 1991, as well as several Parents’ Choice Awards and the Service to Children Television Award from the National Association of Broadcasters.

     

    • Cast of Sparks

      Sparks was a WRAL-TV locally-produced childrens program that premiered August 10, 1985. The program was produced by Peter Anlyan and featured Meredith Nicholson (foreground(, Kent FAulcon, Mark Miller, Mark Kath, Phyllis Bullock and Joshua Lozoff.

    • SPARKS

      This episode of “SPARKS” features the story of the great magician Harry Houdini. “SPARKS” was an innovative children’s program designed to interest youngsters 6-11 years old. Characters portrayed by local actors. “SPARKS” was a finalist in the National Association of Television Program Executives’ 20th Annual Iris Award and an Honors Program in the Parent’s Choice 1986 Television Awards category. Program debuted on August 10, 1985. Produced by Peter Anlyan. Directed by Bob Gubar.

    • Former Sparks cast member entertains FOX 50 staff

      Illusionist Joshua Lozoff entertains WRAZ-TV staff at 2014 Christmas party. Lozoff played the grandson in the WRAL-TV childrens show Sparks.

    • Sparks

      “SPARKS” was an innovative children’s program designed to interest youngsters 6-11 years old. Characters portrayed by local actors. “SPARKS” was a finalist in the National Association of Television Program Executives’ 20th Annual Iris Award and an Honors Program in the Parent’s Choice 1986 Television Awards category. Program debuted on August 10, 1985.

    • Sparks

      “SPARKS” An innovative children’s program designed for youngsters 6-11 years old. The first episode premiered on August 10, 1985.

  • Uncle Paul

    Uncle Paul

    “Time for Uncle Paul” was the most enduring and beloved children’s program in WRAL-TV history.

    The show aired weekday mornings from 1961-1981 and featured the legendary Paul Montgomery as “Uncle Paul” — a jovial studio ringmaster who delighted pre-school children and adults alike with a simple formula of fun and games.

    Each day Montgomery donned a top hat, bow-tie and tattered tails to entertain youngsters and adults alike. His repertoire included stunts, puppets, cartoons and appearances from a variety of off-beat characters.

    The highlight of every show came when Uncle Paul would declare “Time to March!” and the kids would parade around the studio, often accompanied by Montgomery playing piano or organ. Thousands of North Carolina grownups recall how they “marched with Uncle Paul” and most consider it one of their fondest childhood memories.

    “Time For Uncle Paul” was recorded live before a studio audience and aired the next day so the children could see themselves on television. Uncle Paul was the star, but he was ably assisted by the lovable “Aunt Millie,” who off-camera was Mildred Bradley, the secretary of WRAL’s film department.

    Uncle Paul interacted with a cast of strange characters, including “Crawford the Lion,” a puppet manipulated by WRAL Art Director Art Anderson. Later, voice-actor and puppeteer Rowell Gormon joined the program and created zany characters such as Stripes the Skunk; a “hepcat” named Zoot; Malcolm the Frog; and Woody the Wood Gremlin.

    “Time for Uncle Paul” was a program created out of necessity; WRAL-TV had broadcast the “Bozo the Clown” cartoon show during the 1960-’61 season, but decided not to renew the expensive licensing contract when it ran out. Station managers still wanted a children’s program in the time period, however, so they turned to the multi-talented Montgomery, and the result was North Carolina television history.

    Uncle Paul’s twenty-year run on WRAL-TV came to an end in 1981. The Federal Communications Commission was beginning to pressure television stations to include educational elements in children’s programming. When WRAL managers asked Montgomery to give the show a more informational tone, he balked, saying children needed to have fun as well as learn. Rather than change his beloved program, Montgomery decided to voluntarily end the show and retire.

    Following his television days, Paul Montgomery continued a stellar career as a renowned jazz musician and composer. He died on Christmas Eve 2002 at the age of 78.

     

    • Sally Blackwell

      WRAL-TV personality Sally Blackwell entertaining kids on the Uncle Paul Show in 1965.

    • Sally Blackwell from Uncle Paul Show

      Blackwell assisted Paul Montgomery with childrens program. This photo from February 1966.

    • WRAL Christmas parade float

      Paul Montgomery and Margaret Brickell ride the TV5 float in the 1959 Raleigh Christmas parade.

    • Rowell Gormon the voice of Zoot

      Rowell Gormon is the multi-talented, creative genius who produced award winning commercials for WRAL-FM and served as the Production Manager for many years. Rowell might be best known for creating a puppet named “Zoot” who became a side-kick for FBI – Famous Bob Inskeep, during the morning radio show that aired in the late 70s and 80s. Rowell also provided various puppet characters for The Uncle Paul Show. He acted in an episode of “Sparks” that aired in July 1988.

      Rowell continues to act and provides voices for top name brand companies and is a brilliant copy writer.

      Rowell is interviewed by John Harris, Corporate Director of Special Projects.

    • Uncle Paul Show promo 1977

      Uncle Paul was a very popular character portrayed by Paul Montgomery, an accomplish jazz pianist who was also legally blind. The video shows Uncle Paul talking with Mr. Anybody, portrayed by Rowell Gormon, about the program, “Time for Uncle Paul,” moving to a new time period. Promo produced in 1977.